Leonard Bernstein: Mass (Remastered) Leonard Bernstein

Cover Leonard Bernstein: Mass (Remastered)

Album info

Album-Release:
1971

HRA-Release:
27.08.2021

Label: Sony Classical

Genre: Classical

Subgenre: Vocal

Artist: Leonard Bernstein

Composer: Leonard Bernstein (1880 - 1990)

Album including Album cover Booklet (PDF)

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  • Leonard Bernstein (1918 - 1990): Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: I. Devotions before Mass:
  • 1Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: I. Devotions before Mass: 1. Antiphon: Kyrie eleison01:56
  • 2Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: I. Devotions before Mass: 2. Hymn and Psalm: "A Simple Song"04:43
  • 3Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: I. Devotions before Mass: 3. Responsory - Alleluia01:08
  • II. First Introit (Rondo):
  • 4Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: II. First Introit (Rondo): 1. Prefatory Prayers05:14
  • 5Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: II. First Introit (Rondo): 2. Thrice-Triple Canon - Dominus vobiscum00:35
  • III. Second Introit:
  • 6Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: III. Second Introit: 1. In nomine Patris02:01
  • 7Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: III. Second Introit: 2. Prayer for the congregation (Chorale: "Almighty Father")01:30
  • 8Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: III. Second Introit: 3. Epiphany00:58
  • IV. Confession:
  • 9Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: IV. Confession: 1. Confiteor02:19
  • 10Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: IV. Confession: 2. Trope: "I Don't Know"01:42
  • 11Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: IV. Confession: 3. Trope: "Easy"05:15
  • V. Meditation:
  • 12Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: V. Meditation: No. 105:09
  • VI. Gloria:
  • 13Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: VI. Gloria: 1. Gloria tibi01:48
  • 14Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: VI. Gloria: 2. Gloria in excelsis01:14
  • 15Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: VI. Gloria: 3. Trope: "Half of the People"00:58
  • 16Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: VI. Gloria: 4. Trope: "Thank You"02:46
  • VII. Meditation
  • 17Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: VII. Meditation: No. 203:57
  • VIII. Epistle:
  • 18Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: VIII. Epistle: "The Word of the Lord"05:57
  • IX. Gospel-Sermon:
  • 19Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: IX. Gospel-Sermon: "God Said"05:02
  • X. Credo:
  • 20Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: X. Credo: 1. Credo in unum Deum01:06
  • 21Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: X. Credo: 2. Trope: "Non Credo"02:15
  • 22Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: X. Credo: 3. Trope: "Hurry"01:20
  • 23Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: X. Credo: 4. Trope: "World Without End"01:44
  • 24Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: X. Credo: 5. Trope: "I Believe in God"02:10
  • XI. Meditation:
  • 25Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XI. Meditation: No. 3 (De profundis, part 1)02:49
  • XII. Offertory:
  • 26Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XII. Offertory (De profundis, part 2)02:01
  • XIII. The Lord's Prayer:
  • 27Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XIII. The Lord's Prayer: 1. Our Father...01:47
  • 28Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XIII. The Lord's Prayer: 2. Trope: "I Go On"02:35
  • XIV. Sanctus:
  • 29Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XIV. Sanctus05:14
  • XV. Agnus Die:
  • 30Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XV. Agnus Dei07:06
  • XVI. Fraction:
  • 31Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XVI. Fraction: "Things Get Broken"14:23
  • XVII. Pax:
  • 32Bernstein: Mass - A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers I: XVII. Pax: Communion ("Secret Songs")09:53
  • Total Runtime01:48:35

Info for Leonard Bernstein: Mass (Remastered)



This remastered reissue of the watershed recording of MASS by Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), celebrates the 50th anniversary of its 1971 world premiere presentation. Commissioned by Jacqueline Kennedy for the opening of the Kennedy Center, this religious/stage work with its eclectic mix of classical, jazz, musical, Jewish and rock music elements, as well as a mix of Latin liturgical text from the Roman Catholic Mass and original English text, created quite a stir and a barrage of mixed reactions from the public and critics alike back then, and I'm sure it may have the same effect today on the uninitiated.

When this recording was originally released I was a teenager, a church organist well familiar with the Latin Mass settings, and already an avid collector of both classical and rock music recordings, so needless to say that when I heard of its release I rushed (using public transit) to my favorite downtown record shop and immediately purchased a copy (on vinyl of course). I couldn't wait to get home and slap it on my turntable, so imagine my dismay and consternation upon hearing the highly dissonant and harsh opening Kyrie eleison. I thought that Leonard Bernstein had completely gone "round the bend" modern on us. But as soon as I heard the following A Simple Song it became instantly clear that the cacophonous opening was meant to represent the world's multitude of voices clamouring for God's attention and redemption. And by the time I got to the a cappella chorale Almighty Father and the strictly orchestral Meditation No. 1 (audio excerpt below) I began to realize that Bernstein had created a masterwork full of profound ideas, emotions and concepts meant to shake our faith, as well as our musical ear. And by the time you've reached the end, and the introspective Almighty Father returns, this time with full choir, you can't help but feel like you've gone through a "religious" experience.

Yes, some of the songs may seem a bit over the top and would probably feel more at home when witnessed 'live' in their original theatrical setting, but overall this is a highly cohesive work by a multifaceted American composer just as proficient with musicals (West Side Story, On The Town), opera (Candide), jazz (Prelude, Fugue & Riffs) or classical (Symphony No. 2 "The Age of Anxiety"). This remastered 2-disc edition includes a 140-page booklet, a libretto, previously unreleased photos and many new liner notes. If you passed on this recording the first time around, don't miss your proverbial second chance. With all that is happening in today's crazy, hostile and secular world, the impulse behind the creation of this unique work and its effect, are even more powerful today than they were 50 years ago. (Jean-Yves Duperron, August 2021)

Alan Titus, baritone
Leonard Arner, oboe
The Norman Scribner Choir
The Berkshire Boy Choir
Instrumentalensemble
Leonard Bernsteinconductor

MASS was created for the opening of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. on September 8, 1971.

Recorded at John F. Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington, D.C., and Studio B, 49 E. 52nd Street, New York City, in August, September & October 1971.

Digitally remastered


Leonard Bernstein
was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. He took piano lessons as a boy and attended the Garrison and Boston Latin Schools. At Harvard University, he studied with Walter Piston, Edward Burlingame-Hill, and A. Tillman Merritt, among others. Before graduating in 1939, he made an unofficial conducting debut with his own incidental music to 'The Birds,' and directed and performed in Marc Blitzstein's 'The Cradle Will Rock.' Then at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, he studied piano with Isabella Vengerova, conducting with Fritz Reiner, and orchestration with Randall Thompson.

In 1940, he studied at the Boston Symphony Orchestra's newly created summer institute, Tanglewood, with the orchestra's conductor, Serge Koussevitzky. Bernstein later became Koussevitzky's conducting assistant.

Bernstein was appointed to his first permanent conducting post in 1943, as Assistant Conductor of the New York Philharmonic. On November 14, 1943, Bernstein substituted on a few hours notice for the ailing Bruno Walter at a Carnegie Hall concert, which was broadcast nationally on radio, receiving critical acclaim. Soon orchestras worldwide sought him out as a guest conductor.

In 1945 he was appointed Music Director of the New York City Symphony Orchestra, a post he held until 1947. After Serge Koussevitzky died in 1951, Bernstein headed the orchestral and conducting departments at Tanglewood, teaching there for many years. In 1951 he married the Chilean actress and pianist, Felicia Montealegre. He was also visiting music professor, and head of the Creative Arts Festivals at Brandeis University in the early 1950s.

Bernstein became Music Director of the New York Philharmonic in 1958. From then until 1969 he led more concerts with the orchestra than any previous conductor. He subsequently held the lifetime title of Laureate Conductor, making frequent guest appearances with the orchestra. More than half of Bernstein's 400-plus recordings were made with the New York Philharmonic.

Bernstein traveled the world as a conductor. Immediately after World War II, in 1946, he conducted in London and at the International Music Festival in Prague. In 1947 he conducted in Tel Aviv, beginning a relationship with Israel that lasted until his death. In 1953, Bernstein was the first American to conduct opera at the Teatro alla Scala in Milan: Cherubini's 'Medea' with Maria Callas.

Bernstein was a leading advocate of American composers, particularly Aaron Copland. The two remained close friends for life. As a young pianist, Bernstein performed Copland's 'Piano Variations' so often he considered the composition his trademark. Bernstein programmed and recorded nearly all of the Copland orchestral works --many of them twice. He devoted several televised 'Young People's Concerts' to Copland, and gave the premiere of Copland's 'Connotations,' commissioned for the opening of Philharmonic Hall (now Avery Fisher Hall) at Lincoln Center in 1962.

While Bernstein's conducting repertoire encompassed the standard literature, he may be best remembered for his performances and recordings of Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Sibelius and Mahler. Particularly notable were his performances of the Mahler symphonies with the New York Philharmonic in the 1960s, sparking a renewed interest in the works of Mahler. Visit: www.leonardbernstein.com

Booklet for Leonard Bernstein: Mass (Remastered)

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