Stand Up (Steven Wilson Remix, Remastered) Jethro Tull

Album Info

Album Veröffentlichung:
1969

HRA-Veröffentlichung:
17.02.2017

Das Album enthält Albumcover

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  • 1A New Day Yesterday04:11
  • 2Jeffrey Goes To Leicester Square02:12
  • 3Bourée03:48
  • 4Back To The Family03:53
  • 5Look Into The Sun04:37
  • 6Nothing Is Easy04:27
  • 7Fat Man02:52
  • 8We Used To Know04:03
  • 9Reasons For Waiting04:07
  • 10For A Thousand Mothers04:18
  • 11Living In The Past03:25
  • 12Driving Song02:50
  • 13Bourée (Morgan Version)04:18
  • 14Living In The Past (Original Stereo Mix)03:27
  • 15Driving Song (Original Stereo Mix)02:45
  • 16Living In The Past (Original Mono Mix)03:27
  • 17Driving Song (Original Mono Mix)02:51
  • Total Runtime01:01:31

Info zu Stand Up (Steven Wilson Remix, Remastered)

Jethro Tull s second album, Stand Up, marked an early turning point for the band with the addition of guitarist Martin Barre along with Ian Anderson s introduction of folk-rock influences to the group s blues-based sound. Released in the summer of 1969, Stand Up rose quickly to the top of the U.K. Albums Chart, and eventually earned gold certification in the U.S.

„The group's second album, with Anderson (vocals, flute, acoustic guitars, keyboards, balalaika), Martin Barre (electric guitar, flute), Clive Bunker (drums), and Glen Cornick (bass), solidified the group's sound. There is still an element of blues, but except for "A New Day Yesterday," it is far more muted than on their first album, as Mick Abrahams' blues stylings are largely absent from Martin Barre's playing. The influence of folk music also began to manifest itself ("Look Into the Sun"). The instrumental "Bouree," which could've been an early Blood, Sweat & Tears track, became a favorite concert number, although at this point Anderson's flute playing on-stage needed a lot of work; by his own admission, he just wasn't that good. Bassist Cornick would last through only one more album, but he gets his best moments here, on "Bouree." As a story song with opaque lyrics and jarring tempo changes, "Back to the Family" is the forerunner to Thick as a Brick. The only major flaw in this album is the mix, which divides the electric and acoustic instruments and fails to find a solid center. The LP comes with a "pop-up" jacket interior.“ (Bruce Eder, AMG)

Ian Anderson, vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, Hammond organ, piano, mandolin, balalaika, mouth organ
Martin Lancelot Barre, electric guitar, flute (on tracks 2, 9)
Glenn Cornick, bass (all tracks but 5)
Clive Bunker, drums, percussion

Recorded 17 April 1969 - 1 May 1969 at Morgan Studios, London; Olympic Studios on 24 April 1969
Produced by Terry Ellis and Ian Anderson

Digitally remastered




Jethro Tull
formed in February 1968 from the ashes of two unsuccessful blues/rock bands of the era. Ian Anderson brought his unique and innovative style of flute playing to a public raised on the guitar based British bands who courted acceptance at London’s famous Marquee Club.

After their first tentative blues oriented album, titled “This Was,” the group moved through successive records towards a more progressive sound, and with “Aqualung” in 1971 achieved their first real international level of success.

A few hit singles, notably “Living in the Past,” livened up their early career although it was as an album band, with songs of real substance, that the group really took off, both on record and as a major live concert act.

So-called concept albums followed in the early 70’s (“Thick as a Brick” and “A Passion Play”) with the attendant platinum No. 1 album chart sales.

Tull survived the critical backlash of the return-to-basics later 70’s to produce some of their finest creative efforts which, although not quite matching the commercial success of the previous works, established the band as one of the truly creative exponents of progressive music throughout the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s.

They have continued to constantly reinvent themselves, albeit with several personnel changes along the way.

Ian Anderson (flute and vocals) and Martin Barre (guitar) provide to this day the musical and historical backbone of the group, joined by Doane Perry on drums, Andrew Giddings on keyboards, and Jonathan Noyce on bass.

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