Too Legit To Quit (Remastered) M.C. Hammer

Album info

Album-Release:
1991

HRA-Release:
21.09.2021

Label: Capitol Records

Genre: Hip-Hop

Subgenre: Rap

Artist: M.C. Hammer

Album including Album cover

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  • 1This Is The Way We Roll05:53
  • 2Brothers Hang On07:12
  • 32 Legit 2 Quit05:36
  • 4Living In A World Like This05:29
  • 5Tell Me06:38
  • 6Releasing Some Pressure05:03
  • 7Find Yourself A Friend03:56
  • 8Count It Off05:05
  • 9Good To Go04:53
  • 10Lovehold04:55
  • 11Street Soldiers05:00
  • 12Do Not Pass Me By05:30
  • 13Gaining Momentum05:40
  • Total Runtime01:10:50

Info for Too Legit To Quit (Remastered)



Too Legit to Quit is the fourth studio album by Hammer, released on October 29, 1991 by Capitol Records and EMI Records. The album, also produced by Felton Pilate, has been certified silver in the UK by the BPI and triple platinum in the US by the RIAA. The album managed to sell more than 5 million copies.

After dropping the "M.C." from his stage name, Hammer released Too Legit to Quit which answered critics within certain songs from the album.

"With his third album, Too Legit to Quit, Hammer dropped the "MC" from his name, but didn't undergo any major changes musically. Indeed, Legit provided a heavy dose of the thing that made Please Hammer, Don't Hurt Em so successful: likeable, fun pop-rap that appealed to mainstream Top 40 audiences more than the hood. For a few years, Hammer almost seemed to be the Michael Jackson of rap. Although it fell short of Please Hammer's artistic and commercial success, Legit definitely had its share of inviting hits, including "This Is the Way We Roll" and the title song. While Hammer hasn't always been the most challenging artist in the world, the Oakland native has some noteworthy social commentary in "Living in a World Like This" and "Brothers Hang On" -- both of which are disturbing commentaries on the harsh realities of ghetto life." (Alex Henderson, AMG)

Hammer
Digitally remastered



MC Hammer
There had been hit rap singles and albums before him, but MC Hammer was the man who truly brought rap music to a mass pop audience. Armed with a flamboyant wardrobe (particularly his trademark baggy parachute pants) and a raft of sampled hooks lifted straight from their sources, Hammer’s talents as a dancer and showman far exceeded his technique as an MC. Still, he had an ear for catchy source material, and that helped his second album, Please Hammer Don’t Hurt ‘Em, become the best-selling rap album of all time.

Even if he was never able to duplicate that level of success, and even if his street credibility was virtually non-existent, Hammer still broke down numerous doors for rap music in the mainstream, demonstrating that hip-hop had the potential for blockbuster success in the marketplace.

MC Hammer was born Stanley Kirk Burrell in Oakland, California on March 30, 1962. A member of a strongly religious family, he landed a job as a bat/ball boy for the Oakland Athletics baseball team, where he entertained fans by dancing during breaks in the game, and earned the nickname “Hammer” for his resemblance to all-time home run leader “Hammerin'” Hank Aaron. An aspiring ballplayer himself, he failed to catch on with a professional organization following high school, and enlisted in the Navy for three years. Long a fan of funk and soul, he became interested in hip-hop upon returning to civilian life, and began performing in local clubs; with the financial help of several Athletics players, he also started his own record label, Bustin’ Records, and recorded a couple of popular local singles. With ex-Con Funk Shun mastermind Felton Pilate producing, Hammer recorded an album titled Feel My Power in 1987. After impressing a Capitol Records executive with his already elaborate live show, he was signed to a multi-album deal, the first of which was a revamped version of Feel My Power retitled Let’s Get It Started. Producing an R&B hit in “Turn This Mutha Out,” Let’s Get It Started went double platinum.

Still, nothing could have foreshadowed the phenomenon of Please Hammer Don’t Hurt ‘Em, the 1990-released follow-up. Its first single, “U Can’t Touch This,” blatantly copped most of its hooks from Rick James’ funk classic “Super Freak,” yet Hammer’s added catch phrases (and young listeners’ unfamiliarity with the original song) helped make it a smash. “U Can’t Touch This” dominated radio and MTV during 1990 in a way few rap singles ever had, and won two Grammys (Best R&B Song, Best Solo Rap Performance); save for a quirk in its release format — it was only available as a 12″, which cut down on its sales — it would easily have been the first rap single to top the Billboard pop chart. The next two singles, “Have You Seen Her” (a flat-out cover of the Chi-Lites’ ’70s soul ballad) and “Pray” (built on the keyboard hook from Prince’s “When Doves Cry”), followed “U Can’t Touch This” into the Top Ten, eventually pushing sales of Please Hammer Don’t Hurt ‘Em past the ten-million mark and making it the number one album of the year.

The album Family Affair was slated for release on Hammer’s own Oaktown Records label, but plans were aborted at the last minute; only 1,000 copies were pressed, and were never distributed nationally, save for limited Internet downloads. Several projects were rumored to be in the works, including another album (War Chest: Turn of the Century) and a soundtrack to the film Return to Glory: The Powerful Stirring of the Black Man, but none ever appeared. Finally, Hammer released a new album, the patriotic-themed Active Duty, through his own WorldHit label in late 2001.

This album contains no booklet.

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